The terror tree

24 02 2009

THE KINGPIN Abu Al-Qama

PoK-based chief of Lashkar-e-Toiba’s India operations. In his 50s.

THE second rung

Amir Raza Khan

Heads Indian Mujahideen, reports to Al-Qama. Was behind the Kolkata American Center attack of January 2002

Roshan Khan alias Riyaz Bhatkar

Former Fazl-ur-Rehman gangster, IM co-founder. Name cropped up in 7/11, Malegaon blasts probes

Mohd Sadiq Israr Sheikh (32)*

From Sanjarpur, Azamgarh; IM co-founder.

“Controlled” Delhi blasts. Worked as techie in Mumbai

NEXT IN LINE Atif Amin

Headed IM’s Delhi module; executed bombings in Delhi, Jaipur, Ahmedabad. Was killed in Jamia encounter, reported to Sadiq

ASSOCIATES*

Afzal Mutalib Usmani (32)

Stole the 4 Navi Mumbai cars used in Ahmedabad, Surat

Mohd Zakir Sheikh (28)

Scrap dealer, helped plant Gujarat bombs

Mohd Arif Sheikh (28)

Mumbra electrician, built circuits used in Ahmedabad, Surat

Sheikh Mohd Ansar (31)

Software techie, cops probing if he hacked WiFi networks

Advertisements




The Lost Battle

19 02 2009

Source: Outlookindia

Why was the arrest and release on bail of The Statesman editor and publisher largely ignored by media? The governments may have electoral compulsions, but has the media totally given up the battle for free speech?
…… Rajinder Puri

Early February, The Statesman in Kolkata reproduced an article titled “Why should I respect these oppressive religions?” by Johann Hari reproduced from London’s The Independent. The article described how the hypersensitivity of religious fundamentalists was gradually curtailing free speech and rational discourse to make a mockery of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted 60 years ago. In the article there were sceptical allusions to matters of faith ignoring scientific evidence that prevailed in many religions – Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. Some Muslims in Kolkata objected to certain references to Islam in that article. They agitated outside the newspaper office for several days. The newspaper wrote that it had reproduced the article in good faith. It apologized for inadvertently hurting feelings. But the government smelling political advantage on the eve of a general election prosecuted the newspaper for spreading disaffection in violation of law. The editor and the publisher were arrested and later released on bail.

Let’s recall that only last year, Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasreen, who had made Kolkata her home, was forced to flee the state. It is not one’s intention here to justify the article. Possibly the criticism contained in it could have been worded differently — but that is a separate debate. Here, one would like to question the government for its over reaction and prompt arrest of the editor and publisher. By no stretch of imagination was the newspaper article as offensive as, to cite a recent example, Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Karunanidhi’s remarks about Lord Ram made in the context of the Ram Setu agitation. Among other contemptuous allusions to Lord Ram that he made the CM described him as a drunkard. Predictably there were protests and rioting. One person was killed during the protest in Karnataka. Yet, no legal action was taken against the CM.

Then there was the violence unleashed by Maharashtra’s Raj Thackeray against North Indians working in Mumbai. Thackeray objected to people he described as outsiders speaking or putting up signboards in languages other than Marathi. He objected to so-called outsiders seeking employment in Mumbai. He made contemptuous remarks against people from Bihar and provoked a counter agitation in that state. Yet Raj Thackeray walks free. Was he not spreading disaffection among people apart from committing and instigating other crimes such as intimidation and violence against them? You may argue that at least in Thackeray’s case, as in the Statesman case, some police and legal action was undertaken. You may argue that the police in the three states may have different yardsticks. But the basic point is not only one of free speech but of the different yardsticks applied to political leaders and ordinary citizens. The Statesman offered regrets for the article even if arguably that was not warranted. Raj Thackeray remained defiant to the end.

Innumerable cases can be summoned of politicians brazenly violating laws and remaining unpunished. Innumerable cases can be summoned of ordinary citizens being harassed though innocent, or being punished for perceived minor technical offences. The system of justice in India is pure garbage. The tragedy is that even media remains a mute witness to the rape of justice.





Nandigram condemnation

18 11 2007


sea of Protestors

Protests protests everywhere

Commie goons

We condemn the human rights violation and the violence at Nandigram since 6 November 2007, which demonstrated, yet again, after the massacre of 14 March 2007, the way in which the ruling party in West Bengal does not hesitate to use the state machinery to meet its own narrow political ends. The planned inaction of the police since 6 November, the cordoning off of a large area by cadres of the CPI(M) without interference by the police, is no different in kind from what happened on 14 March. In both cases, the police acted as agents of the ruling party, something which goes completely against the norms of democratic governance.

This nexus between the ruling party and the state machinery becomes clearer when we consider that the police inaction in Nandigram has been matched by excessive police enthusiasm in cracking down on citizens in Kolkata and unleashing terror upon peaceful protestors.

We demand an immediate initiation of a just peace process in Nandigram, as distinct from an enforced normalcy. Such an initiative cannot take place without the restraining of ruling party cadres and mercenaries and ending the reign of terror that has been unleashed on the people. A just peace process, which will enable the people of Nandigram to return to their homes, must involve residents of Nandigram, together with a broad-based people’s initiative.

It is clear that the government has been complicit in creating a situation of terror in Nandigram. We hold the Chief Minister of West Bengal, who is also in charge of the police, directly accountable for this state of affairs.

600 Dalits and Muslims have been killed in Nandigram
Nov. 14, 2007 (detailed news Item here from rediff)
Over 600 Dalits and Muslims have been killed in Nandigram, most of them in the last week, claimed Dalit activist Dr Udit Raj, quoting a report from the West Bengal unit of the Indian Justice Party and the All India Confederation of SC/ST Organisations. Dr Raj is president of the IJP and chairman of the confederation.
In a press release, Dr Udit Raj claimed this was the reason why the media and social activists were kept out of the area.

No action taken by police 10 days after incident, CPM cadres still control access

Nandigram, Nov 16: It’s been 10 days since Sabina Begum (name changed to protect her identity) was allegedly gangraped by CPM men during “Operation Recapture,” as first reported in The Indian Express today. But the Nandigram police, who registered a case after the medical report confirmed the rape, say they have not been able to visit the victim’s house in Satengabari, the scene of the crime that can yield crucial evidence in the case.

(http://www.indianexpress.com/story/240207.html)

For more details and resources
http://development-dialogues.blogspot.com/





Nandigram condemnation

18 11 2007


sea of Protestors

Protests protests everywhere

Commie goons

We condemn the human rights violation and the violence at Nandigram since 6 November 2007, which demonstrated, yet again, after the massacre of 14 March 2007, the way in which the ruling party in West Bengal does not hesitate to use the state machinery to meet its own narrow political ends. The planned inaction of the police since 6 November, the cordoning off of a large area by cadres of the CPI(M) without interference by the police, is no different in kind from what happened on 14 March. In both cases, the police acted as agents of the ruling party, something which goes completely against the norms of democratic governance.

This nexus between the ruling party and the state machinery becomes clearer when we consider that the police inaction in Nandigram has been matched by excessive police enthusiasm in cracking down on citizens in Kolkata and unleashing terror upon peaceful protestors.

We demand an immediate initiation of a just peace process in Nandigram, as distinct from an enforced normalcy. Such an initiative cannot take place without the restraining of ruling party cadres and mercenaries and ending the reign of terror that has been unleashed on the people. A just peace process, which will enable the people of Nandigram to return to their homes, must involve residents of Nandigram, together with a broad-based people’s initiative.

It is clear that the government has been complicit in creating a situation of terror in Nandigram. We hold the Chief Minister of West Bengal, who is also in charge of the police, directly accountable for this state of affairs.

600 Dalits and Muslims have been killed in Nandigram
Nov. 14, 2007 (detailed news Item here from rediff)
Over 600 Dalits and Muslims have been killed in Nandigram, most of them in the last week, claimed Dalit activist Dr Udit Raj, quoting a report from the West Bengal unit of the Indian Justice Party and the All India Confederation of SC/ST Organisations. Dr Raj is president of the IJP and chairman of the confederation.
In a press release, Dr Udit Raj claimed this was the reason why the media and social activists were kept out of the area.

No action taken by police 10 days after incident, CPM cadres still control access

Nandigram, Nov 16: It’s been 10 days since Sabina Begum (name changed to protect her identity) was allegedly gangraped by CPM men during “Operation Recapture,” as first reported in The Indian Express today. But the Nandigram police, who registered a case after the medical report confirmed the rape, say they have not been able to visit the victim’s house in Satengabari, the scene of the crime that can yield crucial evidence in the case.

(http://www.indianexpress.com/story/240207.html)

For more details and resources
http://development-dialogues.blogspot.com/