Naxalites Human rights violations: ACHR

21 07 2008

The Naxalites in killings.

They have been responsible for killing of at least 120
persons during April – June 2006, including 38 security
personnel, 75 civilians and 7 Naxalites in internecine
conflict. Of them, 26 persons, including 14 security
personnel and 12 civilians, were killed in improvised
explosive device explosions allegedly triggered by the
Naxalites.
The Naxalites have been responsible for gross
violations of international humanitarian laws including
abduction, hostage taking, torture, hacking to death,
shooting from point blank range and trial by Jana Adalat,
peoples’ court.
Representatives of ACHR met some of the released
hostages kidnapped by the Naxalites from Manikonta
village in Dantewada district of Chhattisgarh on 25 April
2006. The Naxalites abducted 52 tribal villagers, including
13 women while they were returning from Manikonta
village to the government-run relief camp at Dornapal in
Dantewada district of Chhattisgarh. The villagers being
sheltered at the relief camp had gone to Manikonta village
to bring their personal belongings. The Naxalites killed 15
villagers in custody and released the rest. While the bullet-
ridden bodies of two abducted villagers were recovered on
28 April 2006, bodies of 13 other villagers were recovered
from a deep forest with slit throats. The bodies also bore
multiple wounds. The rest 37 persons were released on 29
April 2006 after warning that they would not join the
Salwa Judum programme of the government.
The released hostages told ACHR representatives
that their captors “selected” 13 hostages, tied their hands
from behind and blindfolded them. Then, the rebels
stabbed them repeatedly before slitting their throats
before other hostages. The hostages were allegedly denied
adequate food and forced to drink urine when they
demanded water.

Bihar
On 24 April 2006, suspected Naxalites gunned down
six civilians, including a panchayat poll candidate, Mr
Ashok Kumar Singh while returning home after
campaigning for elections at Deojora village in
Aurangabad district. Six others were also injured. The
alleged Naxals also set fire to the dead bodies.
Chhattisgarh
Chhattisgarh continues to be epicentre of the killings
resulting into massive violations of the right to life of the
civilians.
On 8 April 2006, alleged Naxalites shot dead three
Salwa Judum activists including Toda (40) and Krishna
Rao (35) in a pre-dawn strike at Kunnapara in Gangalur
under Dantewada district. The Maoists reportedly
rounded the Salwa Judum activists and opened
indiscriminate fire on them, killing three on the spot and
injuring six others.
On the night of 18 April 2006, suspected Naxalites
killed a Salwa Judum activist identified as Chamruram
Raiti, son of Sampatram Baiti, near Mirtur village in
Bijapur police district. Raiti was allegedly dragged from his
house, brutally tortured in front of other villagers and was
later hacked to death.
On the night of 13 June 2006, alleged Naxalites beat
to death Samaru Ram, Sarpanch of Edka village under
Narayanpur police station area in Bastar district after he
was sentenced to death in a Jan Adalat for allegedly
demanding a police station in the village. The alleged
Naxalite cadres dragged the village Sarpanch out of his
house and organized a Jan Adalat in the night where he
was brutally thrashed with rod and lathis in full public
view. The Sarpanch succumbed to his injuries.
On 14 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed two Salwa
Judum activists including Telam Koaram, head of the
Tumnar village in Bijapur. The alleged Naxalites
reportedly surrounded his house and beheaded him with
a sickle.
On 19 June 2006, alleged Naxalites mercilessly killed
7 villagers and injured 3 others after attacking
Chikuarguda village in Dantewada district. Alleged
Naxalites raided Chikuarguda village and took hostage
about 25 people. Then they reportedly shot, beat and
stabbed to death seven villagers. Three others were
injured. Some houses were also looted and burnt.
Maharashtra
On 16 May 2006, at least 12 people of a marriage
party from Chhattisgarh were killed on the spot when
Naxalites triggered an improvised explosive device
between villages Halewara and Petha in Gadchiroli
district. The victims included three women and two
children. The CPI-Maoists tendered an apology stating
that the civilians were targeted by mistake and assured
action against those responsible for the “negligence”.
On 16 June 2006, Naxalites allegedly beheaded an
Adivasi identified as Alal Lagatu Kantigal (42) suspecting
him to be a police informer near Savargaon in Gadchiroli
district. The deceased was dragged out of his house early
in the morning and beheaded.
Jharkhand
On 3 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed three alleged
members of the Village Protection Group – Sukara
Munda, Guruchan Munda and Soharia Munda – by
slitting their throats at Hadian village under Gurabanda
police station limits in East Singhbhum district.
On the night of 3 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed
a villager identified as Yashen Ansari on the charges of
being a police informer at Barwatoli village under
Chandwa police station in Latehar district. The alleged
Naxalites reportedly barged into the house of the
deceased, picked him up and killed him in the nearby
forest.
On 17 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed an
innocent villager identified as Shyam Sundar Singh after
trying him in Jan Adalat in the forests of Banehesla in
Lohardaga district. The Maoists’ Jan Adalat charged the
deceased of being a police “informer” and he was brutally
tortured. He succumbed to his injuries after he reached
home at Siram.
On the night of 22 June 2006, alleged CPI (Maoist)
cadres reportedly shot dead five activists of a breakaway
faction Maoist Communist Centre-Third Conference at
Bhuiandih village in Chatra district. Earlier on 21 June
2006, two CPI (Maoist) cadres were shot dead by
MCC(TC) activists in neighbouring Latehar district.

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Naxalites Human rights violations: ACHR

21 07 2008

The Naxalites in killings.

They have been responsible for killing of at least 120
persons during April – June 2006, including 38 security
personnel, 75 civilians and 7 Naxalites in internecine
conflict. Of them, 26 persons, including 14 security
personnel and 12 civilians, were killed in improvised
explosive device explosions allegedly triggered by the
Naxalites.
The Naxalites have been responsible for gross
violations of international humanitarian laws including
abduction, hostage taking, torture, hacking to death,
shooting from point blank range and trial by Jana Adalat,
peoples’ court.
Representatives of ACHR met some of the released
hostages kidnapped by the Naxalites from Manikonta
village in Dantewada district of Chhattisgarh on 25 April
2006. The Naxalites abducted 52 tribal villagers, including
13 women while they were returning from Manikonta
village to the government-run relief camp at Dornapal in
Dantewada district of Chhattisgarh. The villagers being
sheltered at the relief camp had gone to Manikonta village
to bring their personal belongings. The Naxalites killed 15
villagers in custody and released the rest. While the bullet-
ridden bodies of two abducted villagers were recovered on
28 April 2006, bodies of 13 other villagers were recovered
from a deep forest with slit throats. The bodies also bore
multiple wounds. The rest 37 persons were released on 29
April 2006 after warning that they would not join the
Salwa Judum programme of the government.
The released hostages told ACHR representatives
that their captors “selected” 13 hostages, tied their hands
from behind and blindfolded them. Then, the rebels
stabbed them repeatedly before slitting their throats
before other hostages. The hostages were allegedly denied
adequate food and forced to drink urine when they
demanded water.

Bihar
On 24 April 2006, suspected Naxalites gunned down
six civilians, including a panchayat poll candidate, Mr
Ashok Kumar Singh while returning home after
campaigning for elections at Deojora village in
Aurangabad district. Six others were also injured. The
alleged Naxals also set fire to the dead bodies.
Chhattisgarh
Chhattisgarh continues to be epicentre of the killings
resulting into massive violations of the right to life of the
civilians.
On 8 April 2006, alleged Naxalites shot dead three
Salwa Judum activists including Toda (40) and Krishna
Rao (35) in a pre-dawn strike at Kunnapara in Gangalur
under Dantewada district. The Maoists reportedly
rounded the Salwa Judum activists and opened
indiscriminate fire on them, killing three on the spot and
injuring six others.
On the night of 18 April 2006, suspected Naxalites
killed a Salwa Judum activist identified as Chamruram
Raiti, son of Sampatram Baiti, near Mirtur village in
Bijapur police district. Raiti was allegedly dragged from his
house, brutally tortured in front of other villagers and was
later hacked to death.
On the night of 13 June 2006, alleged Naxalites beat
to death Samaru Ram, Sarpanch of Edka village under
Narayanpur police station area in Bastar district after he
was sentenced to death in a Jan Adalat for allegedly
demanding a police station in the village. The alleged
Naxalite cadres dragged the village Sarpanch out of his
house and organized a Jan Adalat in the night where he
was brutally thrashed with rod and lathis in full public
view. The Sarpanch succumbed to his injuries.
On 14 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed two Salwa
Judum activists including Telam Koaram, head of the
Tumnar village in Bijapur. The alleged Naxalites
reportedly surrounded his house and beheaded him with
a sickle.
On 19 June 2006, alleged Naxalites mercilessly killed
7 villagers and injured 3 others after attacking
Chikuarguda village in Dantewada district. Alleged
Naxalites raided Chikuarguda village and took hostage
about 25 people. Then they reportedly shot, beat and
stabbed to death seven villagers. Three others were
injured. Some houses were also looted and burnt.
Maharashtra
On 16 May 2006, at least 12 people of a marriage
party from Chhattisgarh were killed on the spot when
Naxalites triggered an improvised explosive device
between villages Halewara and Petha in Gadchiroli
district. The victims included three women and two
children. The CPI-Maoists tendered an apology stating
that the civilians were targeted by mistake and assured
action against those responsible for the “negligence”.
On 16 June 2006, Naxalites allegedly beheaded an
Adivasi identified as Alal Lagatu Kantigal (42) suspecting
him to be a police informer near Savargaon in Gadchiroli
district. The deceased was dragged out of his house early
in the morning and beheaded.
Jharkhand
On 3 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed three alleged
members of the Village Protection Group – Sukara
Munda, Guruchan Munda and Soharia Munda – by
slitting their throats at Hadian village under Gurabanda
police station limits in East Singhbhum district.
On the night of 3 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed
a villager identified as Yashen Ansari on the charges of
being a police informer at Barwatoli village under
Chandwa police station in Latehar district. The alleged
Naxalites reportedly barged into the house of the
deceased, picked him up and killed him in the nearby
forest.
On 17 June 2006, alleged Naxalites killed an
innocent villager identified as Shyam Sundar Singh after
trying him in Jan Adalat in the forests of Banehesla in
Lohardaga district. The Maoists’ Jan Adalat charged the
deceased of being a police “informer” and he was brutally
tortured. He succumbed to his injuries after he reached
home at Siram.
On the night of 22 June 2006, alleged CPI (Maoist)
cadres reportedly shot dead five activists of a breakaway
faction Maoist Communist Centre-Third Conference at
Bhuiandih village in Chatra district. Earlier on 21 June
2006, two CPI (Maoist) cadres were shot dead by
MCC(TC) activists in neighbouring Latehar district.





Naxalites – ‘Finish them off’

21 07 2008
By Swapan Dasgupta
The nation should be grateful that wisdom has finally dawned on the UPA Government. Last Thursday, at the conclusion of a two-day conference involving the Centre and the States, the Prime Minister proclaimed Naxalism to be “the single biggest internal security challenge ever faced by our country”.

It took the Government two years to acknowledge what should have been evident from the very day the “inner voice” made way for the gentle Sardar. In these two years, the Government allowed an “infantile disorder” — Lenin’s evocative description — to escalate into a full-fledged insurgency.

Today, the “red corridor” isn’t some crazy pipedream of dogmatists who quibble over the virtues of Lin Biao and the Shining Path, it is a near reality. The Maoists have cast their terror net over an area that covers some 20 per cent of India’s forests and districts where 17 per cent of the population of the live.

To consider the magnitude of the Naxalite problem you have to keep in mind a contrasting statistic: ethnic and religious insurgencies in the North-east and Jammu and Kashmir affect only three per cent of the population.

Ironically, it was the magnitude of the menace that made the Government look the other way initially. After the UPA Government was installed, its so-called national security pundits, better versed in political surveillance and collecting tittle-tattle from mobile phones than countering terror, evolved a fantastic theory.

Since the Naxalites were in a position to influence the outcome in nearly 50 parliamentary constituencies, it would be expedient, they suggested, for the Congress to cut a covert deal with them. After all, it was asserted, the nature of the ramshackle coalition made it necessary to be prepared for an election at all times.

The lessons of history were not learnt. It was the Bhindranwale and LTTE strategy all over again!

Consequently, the Andhra Pradesh Government despatched the Greyhounds to the barracks, declared a cease-fire and began a bout of negotiations that both the Government and the extremists knew was pointless. There was unending talk of addressing the ubiquitous “socio-economic” roots of terror, and bleeding hearts decreed that the antidote to the perversions of Charu Mazumdar was the Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme and the Tribal Bill.

For the Maoists, it was carnival time. They used the respite to set their own house in order and prepare for a long haul. First, even as the Centre abandoned the “unified command” strategy proposed by the erstwhile NDA Government, the Naxalites abandoned their ideological hair-splitting and came together under the banner of the Communist Party (Maoist). The name reflected the new party’s deep links with the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), which controls nearly three-fourths of the Himalayan kingdom.

Second, the interregnum was used by the Naxalites to develop deep pockets and re-arm. It is estimated by the Delhi-based Institute of Conflict Management that the Naxalites in Andhra Pradesh collected Rs 50 to 60 crore by extortion in the six months of the cease-fire.

Even after the battle was resumed in Andhra Pradesh, the Centre rubbed its hands gleefully as the Naxalite problem was exported to Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Orissa — states with NDA Governments. Some six months ago when Chhatisgarh approached the Home Minister with a detailed plan of airborne operations against the Naxalites in the jungles, it was told the suggestion was preposterous. “Talk to them, they are our own boys,” the state government was gratuitously informed.

In Jharkhand, the Centre chose to look the other way as Naxalites systematically siphoned off large amounts of development assistance from petrified local officials. In Chhattisgarh, a systematic campaign of calumny was heaped against the Sarwa Judum movement, which used democratic mobilisation against the Naxalites.

Most damaging, the Indian Government played footsie with the Maoists in Nepal because some mandarins were not amused by King Gyanendra. Today, a Maoist Nepal on our doorstep looks imminent. A springboard for the Indian Revolution has been created. The revolution in Nepal, Comrade Prachanda has, after all, always maintained, depends on the India revolution for survival.

No wonder the Naxalites are sufficiently emboldened to mount audacious attacks against symbols of state authority like prisons, treasuries and armouries. Today, there is a People’s Liberation Army in place that has launched a civil war. It is estimated that this underground force has an annual budget that amounts to Rs 200 crore — the ill-gotten returns from extortion and banditry.

It has taken the Government two years to realise that the Naxalites are no longer content with welfare sops and lectures on land reforms. Promoting development and fighting poverty was never on the agenda of the Maoists.

Their target was and remains political power. The assault is not on high landlordism or venal usury. It is an assault on the sovereignty of the Indian state. The Maoists want the tricolour and the Constitution replaced by the Red Flag and “people’s power”.

It is important to realise that this menace cannot be eradicated with an Indira Gramin Yojana or the well-meaning prescriptions of the headless National Advisory Council. South Asia has a rich experience of countering terror.

In the 1970s, Siddhartha Shankar Ray brought West Bengal back from the brink and Presidents J.R. Jayewardene and R. Premadasa exorcised the JVP menace from Sri Lanka. Neither in West Bengal nor in Sri Lanka was squeamishness allowed to get in the way of pacification.

Military-style operations were launched against the extremists, their top leadership was neutralised and terror was met with the full weight of state authority. Bullets were met with cannon fire — and it worked without damaging democracy.

These strategies may not meet with approval in the seminar rooms and human rights conclaves. That should be least of our concerns. What matters is political will to win the civil war.

In any case, Manmohan Singh need not be worried. He should take heart from what the CPI(M) Chief Minister Buddhadeva Bhattacharya told an election rally in Naxalite-infested Purulia district: “The thick forest cover of the Jharkhand border is saving the Naxalites. Otherwise, our police force would have finished them off.”

In the war against Naxalism, it is the last three words of Bhattacharya that are relevant.





Sreelatha Menon: A homecoming in Bastar

21 07 2008
Sreelatha Menon: A homecoming in Bastar
Sreelatha Menon / New Delhi July 20, 2008, 0:26 IST

The collector of Dantewada has agreed to give 10 quintals of paddy seed to restart farming in Nendra. Nendra is a village in Konta block in Dantewada district in Chhattisgarh which has been lying deserted for the last three years after multiple attacks by the government-backed anti-Naxal militia, the Salwa Judum, and the police. The collector’s gesture was in reciprocation of a rehabilitation effort by an NGO called Vanvasi Chetna Ashram to facilitate homecoming for the villagers who were living either in jungles fearing reprisals from the Salwa Judum and the police, or in neighbouring villages of Andhra Pradesh. Some of them are in camps set up by the state government.

The effort started this month, with 11 members of the ashram turning into a human shield and escorting the fugitive tribals to their village and staying with them.

There has been little support from the police. There were firings on the villagers. The first incident made them run for their lives to their familiar hideouts in the jungles.

Two boys, Madkam Bheem and Vetti Pojja, both about 16 years old, were caught this week while returning from the markets in the villages of Andhra Pradesh and are currently in Dantewada jail.

The police fired in the village a second time this week. But this time, the villagers did not flee and the police returned without harming anyone.

Himanshu Kumar, who has been running the ashram for the last 16 years in the Bastar area, says more villages are seeking their human shields to revive life in the abandoned hamlets.

People who have fled from about 25 villages are meeting in Nendra to extend the human shield initiative to their villages.

The human shield members, who took with them 15 quintals of paddy and a lot of clothes for the 100 families returning to Nendra, are currently helping the people cultivate their abandoned fields.

The collector’s gesture was to support this effort.

The Supreme Court ruled recently that the government of Chhattisgarh was acting in an illegal and unconstitutional way in arming civilians to fight the Naxalites. A report of the Planning Commission seconded this and said that Salwa Judum was a terrible mistake and had no place in a democratic and free country.

The Planning Commission report on Salwa Judum and Naxalites was presented yesterday before the home ministry’s task force.

What will take the powers-to-be to change their mind and understand that people have to live in their homes and cannot be held fugitives in their own country?

The human shield initiative is, meanwhile, preparing to leave for another deserted village, Vechapad, in Bhairamgadh block in Bastar’s Bijapur district. Himanshu Kumar says he has informed the police but they are asking them to wait saying an operation was going on there.

What is the guarantee that people returning from the Salwa Judum camps, usually identified with the atrocities attributed to the Salwa Judum, would be let off by the Naxalites and the people hiding in the jungles?

Himanshu Kumar says he has been speaking to the villagers outside the camps and they say there is no danger from them. He says Naxalites are also promising that they will not make reprisal attacks on the villagers and the SPOs if they come home.

At a time the government is introspecting about the Salwa Judum and does not know what to do with the Naxalites, the worst thing it can do is to sever ties with the civil society. It can begin by looking at activists like Himanshu Kumar and Binayak Sen as just that rather than conspirators against it, and instead use jails and police against criminals rather than activists.

NAVHIND TIMES

Roots of the Problem

EDITORIAL

During last one month the Maoists have killed nearly 60 security personnel belonging to the Greyhound force, constituted specially to counter Naxalite actions in various states. They trapped a boat carrying 40 jawans of the Greyhound who were on their mission to Orissa from Andhra Pradesh and killed them. A few days ago they killed 20 jawans in Orissa’s Malkangiri district in a mine blast. Even the Mine Protected Vehicle in which the cops were moving failed to protect them. Significantly this vehicle costing Rs 55 lakh was developed to suit the needs of paramilitary forces operating in Naxalite areas. Unfortunately this vehicle could not withstand the Naxalite attack. In fact the attack did not come suddenly. The general secretary of the CPI (Maoist), Mr M Lakshmana Rao alias Ganapathy had warned that they would intensify their actions against the state machinery, as destruction of the enemy forces was on their immediate agenda. In fact the Maoist targeting the enemy is not confined to Orissa or Andhra Pradesh, but it is happening also in Kiul in the eastern parts of Bihar. They have been blowing rail tracks and killing security forces and also innocent people. Though the government has been promising to take on the Naxalites so far it has not resulted in any significant reduction, except for deployment of some well-trained police personnel. Significantly on the eve of the meeting of chief ministers of Naxalite-affected states in Hyderabad last September, the Prime Minister had suggested to the states to evolve a concrete socio-economic action programme to counter the Naxalite challenge. But so far the central government or the concerned states have not chalked out any such programme and instead continue to follow the old path of meeting force with force. Look at the modus operandi of the Naxalites. They have selected the backward areas of eastern and central India and indoctrinated poor people. The resurgence of Naxalism in these areas owes to the callous administration of the state governments in these regions. The government ought to realize that it cannot counter Naxalites with force. It must reach out to the poor of the regions and give them real empowerment. It must realize that India is home not only to middle classes, but also to 70 per cent of people who are poor.

10 worst actions (attacks ) by NAXALISTES

The recent daring Naxal attack in Nayagarh, raised questions on the effectiveness of government’s intelligence system and the strength of police force to face the Maoist menace. States like Orissa, Bihar, Jharkhand, Chhatisgarh, Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal are worst-affected by an unprecedented spur in Naxal activities.

People’s struggle has unfortunately transformed into a power struggle. We have listed the 10 deadliest naxal or Maoist attacks in India in the past five years. They are listed in a chronological order. Here you go:

1) Attack on N. Chandrababu Naidu (Oct, 2003)

The TDP chief and then Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu had a narrow escape, when one of the Naxalites, failed to intimate his team about Mr. Naidu’s exact movement. A few seconds delay in triggering the claymore mines, saved Naidu’s life. Naidu, his colleague, B. Gopalakrishna Reddy, legislators R. Rajasekhara Reddy and Chadalavada Krishna Murthy, and security personnel were injured in the attack. Naidu was on his way to Tirupati on October 01, 2003, when the attack was carried out by a special team of Maoists at the foothills of Tirumala.

2) Naxal Attack in Koraput (2004)

In a daring attack, over 1000 Maoists attacked Orissa’s district headquarter town of Koraput and looted 2000 sophisticated guns and other weapons worth Rs 50 crore. There was a panic in the town, as the Naxalites continued their operation for 6 hours. They looted the district armory, five police stations, Koraput jail, SP’s office and the OSAP battalion. One sentry and two CRPF jawans were killed and 11 others injured in the attack. Over 500 Maoists were involved in the operation.

3) Jehanabad Jail-break (2005)

On November 13, 2005, over 1,000 Maoists laid virtual siege to Jehanabad town on the night of November 13, 2005 and freed over 375 prisoners including 130 Naxalites. The Naxal operation continued for seven hours and security personnel could do nothing to prevent this. They killed several Ranvir Sena men and police personnel. The Maoists looted 185 rifles and 2,000 rounds of ammunition.

4) Naxal attack in R Udayagiri, 40 Prisoners freed (Feb, 2006)

On March 24, 2006, Maoists lashed with arms and ammunition, attacked the Orissa State Armed Police camp at R Udayagiri in Gajapati district of Orissa, killing three policemen. The looted arms and freed around 40 prisoners. There were more than 500 Maoists involved in the attack.

5) Chhatisgarh Naxal Attack (2006)

At least 25 people were killed and 80 others injured, when over 800 armed Naxalites attacked a village in Dantewada district of Chhatisgarh on July 17, 2006. Some of the villages were hacked to death with sharp weapons, while few were charred to death. The attack took place at Errabore relief camp where more than 4000 people had taken shelter. The Naxalites also kidnapped more than 20 people, while 200 others fled from the spot.

6) Naxalites kill JMM MP Sunil Mahato (2007)

Armed Naxalites shot dead JMM MP (Lok Sabha) Sunil Kumar Mahato, his bodyguards and a party colleague while they were watching a football match at Bakuria village near Jamshedpur in Jharkhand. The incident took place on March 05, 2007.

7) Naxalites attack Police Outpost, kill 55 Security Pesonnel (2007)

The Naxalites attacked a police outpost in Chhatisgarh’s Rani Bodli village in Chhatisgarh, killing 55 police personnel. 24 of the deceased belonged to state police, while 31 others were Special Police Officers (SPOs). It was an irony that the security personnel were unable to even defend themselves – forget about the counter-attack. Most of the policemen were asleep when over 500 Naxalites carried out the attack. They used sophisticated weapons, lobbed grenades and bombs on them.

8) Naxal attack in Dantewada, 303 Prisoners freed (2007)

The Naxalites attacked the Dantewada jail and freed 303 priosners. Over 100 of them were Naxalites. They also snatched weapons of prison guards. The incident occurred on December 16, 2007. It was a major blow for the state government. It was reported that most of them fled to the jungles of Orissa. Although 25 prisoners, were recaptured, none of them were Naxalites.

9) Naxalites kill Babulal Marandi’s son (2007)

Former Jharkhand CM Babulal Marandi’s son Anup and 17 others were killed in a Naxal attack at Chilkhadia village in Giridih district of Jharkhand. The Naxals opened indiscriminate fire and exploded bombs when a cultural program was being held. Marandi’s brother Nunulal, who was also present at the function, escaped unhurt.

10) Nayagarh Naxal Attack (2008)

The Naxal attack in Nayagarh on the night of February 15, 2008, was called as the mother of all Naxal attacks. Hundreds of Maoists came in buses and trucks, and laid seize of the district headquarter town of Nayagarh in Orissa. Nayagarh is only 90 minutes away from the state capital, Bhubaneswar and no Naxal activities were reported in that area in the past.

A large group of Naxalites attacked the police stations in Nayagarh, Dashpalla and Nuagaon. They killed 14 policemen and one civilian. They also torched the Police Training School. The Maoists looted a huge number of arms and ammunition (worth crores of rupees) from the armoury.

The Orissa government launched the biggest anti-Naxal operation in the country to track down the Naxals. Over 700 state police personnel, CRPF personnel, SOG Commandos, Special Greyhound Force from Andhra Pradesh and IAF Helicopters launched massive offensive on the Naxals by encirling them at Gasma mountain. However, the Naxalites either managed to flee or mixed with the local people, making the task of the security personnel more difficult.

A CRPF Assistant Commandant (one of the co-founders of SOG) and two other security personnel were killed, while over 20 Maoists were reportedly killed. Over 50 percent of the looted arms and ammunition were recovered from the forest. The Orissa government has extended the operation to different parts of the state and it’s still going on.

Chronology of Naxal attacks in recent years
September 7, 2007 Former Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Janardhan Reddy and his wife N Rajyalakshmi, escaped unhurt while three Congress workers were killed in a Maoist attack in Nellore district in Andhra Pradesh.
July 10, 2007 Naxalites attacked a police team with light machine guns and mortar bombs in a dense forest area of Chhattisgarh, killing at least 24 security personnel.
July 1, 2007 Nine persons, including five policemen, were killed and as many were wounded as CPI-Maoist rebels carried out simultaneous attacks on a police station and an outpost in Sasaram in Bihar’s Rohtas district and fled with arms and ammunition.
April 28, 2007 Five security personnel were killed in a landmine blast triggered by Maoist rebels in Michgaon village of Kanker district, about 175 km south of Raipur in Chattisgarh
Mar 16, 2007 Maoists attacked a police post in the remote jungles of in Rani Bodli in Chattisgarh with gunfire, hand grenades and gasoline bombs, killing at least 49 people
March 5, 2007 Naxalites shot dead Jharkhand Mukti Morcha’s Lok Sabha MP Sunil Kumar Mahato. Two of his bodyguards and a party colleague were also killed in the attack when they were witnessing a football match organised to mark Holi at a village in Jamshedpur in Jharkhand
July 17, 2006 At least 25 people were killed and 80 injured, 32 of them seriously, while about 250 people were missing following an attack by some 800 armed Naxalites in Dantewada district of Chattisgarh
February 9, 2006 Eight Central Industrial Security Force personnel were killed and eight others injured when Naxalites raided a godown of the National Mineral Development Corporation (NMDC) and took away explosives from a village near Bailadila in Jagdalpur in Chattisgarh
1 March 2005 In a major attack, Naxalites shot dead eight villagers and blew up a forest rest house, injuring a CRPF constable in Andhra Pradesh
November 13, 2005 Hundreds of activists of the banned Communist Party of India (Maoist) attacked the police lines in south Bihar’s Jehanabad district

(With inputs from PTI and IANS)





Sreelatha Menon: A homecoming in Bastar

21 07 2008
Sreelatha Menon: A homecoming in Bastar
Sreelatha Menon / New Delhi July 20, 2008, 0:26 IST

The collector of Dantewada has agreed to give 10 quintals of paddy seed to restart farming in Nendra. Nendra is a village in Konta block in Dantewada district in Chhattisgarh which has been lying deserted for the last three years after multiple attacks by the government-backed anti-Naxal militia, the Salwa Judum, and the police. The collector’s gesture was in reciprocation of a rehabilitation effort by an NGO called Vanvasi Chetna Ashram to facilitate homecoming for the villagers who were living either in jungles fearing reprisals from the Salwa Judum and the police, or in neighbouring villages of Andhra Pradesh. Some of them are in camps set up by the state government.

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The effort started this month, with 11 members of the ashram turning into a human shield and escorting the fugitive tribals to their village and staying with them.

There has been little support from the police. There were firings on the villagers. The first incident made them run for their lives to their familiar hideouts in the jungles.

Two boys, Madkam Bheem and Vetti Pojja, both about 16 years old, were caught this week while returning from the markets in the villages of Andhra Pradesh and are currently in Dantewada jail.

The police fired in the village a second time this week. But this time, the villagers did not flee and the police returned without harming anyone.

Himanshu Kumar, who has been running the ashram for the last 16 years in the Bastar area, says more villages are seeking their human shields to revive life in the abandoned hamlets.

People who have fled from about 25 villages are meeting in Nendra to extend the human shield initiative to their villages.

The human shield members, who took with them 15 quintals of paddy and a lot of clothes for the 100 families returning to Nendra, are currently helping the people cultivate their abandoned fields.

The collector’s gesture was to support this effort.

The Supreme Court ruled recently that the government of Chhattisgarh was acting in an illegal and unconstitutional way in arming civilians to fight the Naxalites. A report of the Planning Commission seconded this and said that Salwa Judum was a terrible mistake and had no place in a democratic and free country.

The Planning Commission report on Salwa Judum and Naxalites was presented yesterday before the home ministry’s task force.

What will take the powers-to-be to change their mind and understand that people have to live in their homes and cannot be held fugitives in their own country?

The human shield initiative is, meanwhile, preparing to leave for another deserted village, Vechapad, in Bhairamgadh block in Bastar’s Bijapur district. Himanshu Kumar says he has informed the police but they are asking them to wait saying an operation was going on there.

What is the guarantee that people returning from the Salwa Judum camps, usually identified with the atrocities attributed to the Salwa Judum, would be let off by the Naxalites and the people hiding in the jungles?

Himanshu Kumar says he has been speaking to the villagers outside the camps and they say there is no danger from them. He says Naxalites are also promising that they will not make reprisal attacks on the villagers and the SPOs if they come home.

At a time the government is introspecting about the Salwa Judum and does not know what to do with the Naxalites, the worst thing it can do is to sever ties with the civil society. It can begin by looking at activists like Himanshu Kumar and Binayak Sen as just that rather than conspirators against it, and instead use jails and police against criminals rather than activists.





L K Advani inaugurates an exhibition on "Naxalism: A threat to the Unified nation of India"

13 07 2008

For Pictures of the Ehibition Click here

Those who of you couldnt make to
the exhibition, heres’s an online exhibition.

Below are the press release and the photographs of L K Advani’s visit to the
exhibition….

http://i-newswire.com/pr179064.html

http://picasaweb.google.com/vee4ru/NaxalismExhibition02

L K Advani today inaugurated an exhibition by FACT on “Naxalism: A threat to the Unified nation of India” at India Habitat centre Delhi. The Exhibition based is on the statistical and ground reports along with photographs. It is an impressive effort to bring to light the mindless violence in the name of Left wing ideology. Mr Advani after inaugurating the exhibition by lighting the lamp was impressed by the exhibition and remarked “this is a very dedicated effort and I appreciate the organisers FACT and its founder Francois Gautier” He also remarked in the visitors book ” violence can never be a solution to the existing problems or of the future and its efforts like those by Sri Sri Ravishankar and Art of Living that can make a difference”.

The exhibition will be screened until 14th july 2008, while this happens to be the second screening of the exhibition, the first one was held on the sidelines of the “South Asia Peace and Reconciliation conference” Oslo in Norway. This effort happens to be a one of its kind.

The exhibition travels through the pain and sufferings caused by the Left wing seperatism with ample help from Photographs and statistics. Blasted schools that rob the children of their future and childhood, blasted roads and destruction caused in the lives of the peasants whom the Maoists claim to be fighting for are all illustrations of a failed ideology through the gun. Investments in the stock markets by maoists, budgets scaling to crores for ammunition show the loss of ideology of the ‘saviours’ and puts them in question of their deeds by even their own supporters. The exhibition tries to portray and study the sociological and human rights impact from neutral perspective while giving a benefit of doubt for the arguments that “but they are fighting for people”, “but they have sacrificed their lives”, “but they are committed” and a whole lot of questions. The money and the caste conflicts in the naxal movement are by themselves answers to a lot of questions while maoism fights for a so called casteless society.

FACT a not for profit trust and has been working to highlight the mindless killings in the name of ideology and religion. Established in 2003 by Francois Gautier the French journalist, indologist and author living in India for the past 33 years. The recent Historical and Artistic exhibition on Aurangazeb by the organisation has run into trouble after Muslim fundamentalists createdtrouble in chennai.





History of Naxalism

24 06 2008

Courtesy: hindustan Times


Telangana Struggle: By July 1948, 2,500 villages in the south were organised into ‘communes’ as part of a peasant movement which came to be known as Telangana Struggle. Simultaneously the famous Andhra Thesis for the first time demanded that ‘Indian revolution’ follow the Chinese path of protracted people’s war. In June 1948, a leftist ideological document ‘Andhra Letter’ laid down a revolutionary strategy based on Mao Tsetung’s New Democracy.

1964
CPM splits from united CPI and decides to participate in elections, postponing armed struggle over revolutionary policies to a day when revolutionary situation prevailed in the country.

1965-66
Communist leader Charu Majumdar wrote various articles based on Marx-Lenin-Mao thought during the period, which later came to be known as ‘Historic Eight Documents’ and formed the basis of naxalite movement.
· First civil liberties organisation was formed with Telugu poet Sri Sri as president following mass arrests of communists during Indo-China war.

1967
CPM participates in polls and forms a coalition United Front government in West Bengal with Bangla Congress. This leads to schism in the party with younger cadres, including the “visionary” Charu Majumdar, accusing CPM of betraying the revolution.

Naxalbari Uprising (25th May): The rebel cadres led by Charu Majumdar launch a peasants’ uprising at Naxalbari in Darjeeling district of West Bengal after a tribal youth, who had a judicial order to plough his land, was attacked by “goons” of local landlords on March 2. Tribals retaliated and started forcefully capturing back their lands. The CPI (M)-led United Front government cracked down on the uprising and in 72 days of the “rebellion” a police sub-inspector and nine tribals were killed. The Congress govt at the Centre supported the crackdown. The incident echoed throughout India and naxalism was born.

• The ideology of naxalism soon assumed larger dimension and entire state units of CPI (M) in Uttar Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir and some sections in Bihar and Andhra Pradesh joined the struggle.

July-Nov: Revolutionary communist organs ‘Liberation’and ‘Deshbrati’ (Bengali) besides ‘Lokyudh’ (Hindi) were started.
Nov 12-13: Comrades from Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Karnataka, Orissa and West Bengal met and set up All India Coordination Committee of Revolutionaries (AICCR) in the CPI (M).

1968

May 14: AICCR renamed All India Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries (AICCCR) with Comrade S Roy Chowdhury as its convenor. The renamed body decides to boycott elections. Within AICCCR certain fundamental differences lead to the exclusion of a section of Andhra comrades led by Comrade T Nagi Reddy.

1969

April 22: As per the AICCCR’s February decision, a new party CPI (ML) was launched on the birth anniversary of Lenin. Charu Majumdar was elected as the Secretary of Central Organising Committee. AICCR dissolved itself.
May 1: Declaration of the party formation by Comrade Kanu Sanyal at a massive meeting on Shahid Minar ground, Calcutta. CPI (M) tries to disrupt the meeting resulting in armed clash between CPI (M) and CPI (ML) cadres for the first time.

• By this time primary guerrilla zone appear at Debra-gopiballavpur (WB), Musal in Bihar, Lakhimpur Kheri in UP and most importantly Srikakulam in Andhra Pradesh.
May 26-27: Andhra police kill Comrade Panchadri Krishnamurty and six other revolutionaries during a crackdown on Srikakulam struggle in Andhra Pradesh sparking wide protests.
Oct 20: Maoist Communist Centre was formed under Kanhai Chatterjee’s leadership. It had supported Naxalbari struggle but did not join CPI (ML) because of some tactical difference and on the question of the method of party formation.

1970

April 27: Premises of Deshabrati Prakashan, which published Liberation and its sister journals, were raided. CPI (ML) goes underground.
May 11: The first CPI (ML) congress is held in Calcutta under strict underground conditions. Comrade Charu Majumdar is elected the party general secretary.
July 10: Comrades Vempatapu Satyanarayana and Adibatla Kailasam, leaders of Srikakulam uprising are killed in police encounter during the crackdown. Comrade Appu, founder of the Party in Tamil Nadu was also killed around September-October. The Srikakulam movement in continued in Andhra Pradesh till 1975.

• Leading lights of literary world of Telugu like Sri Sri, R V Shastri, Khtuba Rao K V Ramana Reddy, Cherabanda Raju Varavara Rao, C Vijaylakshmi with others joined hands to form VIRASAM (Viplava Rachayithala Sangam) or Revolutionary Writers Association (RWA).

• Artistes from Hyderabad inspired by Srikakulam struggle and the songs of Subharao Panigrahi form a group — Art Lovers – comprising the famous film producer Narasinga Rao and the now legendary Gaddar.

1971

In the background of Bangladesh war, the Army tries to crush the ultra-left movement in West Bengal. Uprising in Birbhum marks the high point of this year.

• Art Lovers change its name to Jana Natya Mandali (JNM) late this year. It joins Communists and start propagating revolutionary ideas through its songs, dances and plays. It functioned legally till 1984.

1972

July: Charu Majumdar is arrested in Calcutta on July 16. He dies in Lal Bazar police lock-up on July 28. Revolutionary struggle suffers serious debacle. CPI (ML)’s central authority collapses.

August:
‘Pilupu’ (The Call), a political magazine was launched in Andhra Pradesh.
• Kondapalli Seetharamaiah reorganises the AP State Committee of Communist Revolutionaries following killing or arrest of the 12-member AP State Committee.

1973
Fresh guerrilla struggles backed by mass activism emerge in parts of central Bihar and Telangana, now a part of Andhra Pradesh.

1974

July 28: The Central Organising Committee of CPI (ML) was reconstituted at Durgapur meeting in West Bengal. Comrade Jauhar (Subrata Dutt) was elected general secretary. Jauhar reorganises CPI (ML) and renames it as CPI (ML) Liberation.

March:
Andhra Pradesh Civil Liberties Committee (APCLP) was formed again with Sri Sri as president.

August:
Andhra Pradesh state committee was reconstituted with Kondapalli Seetharamaiah representing Telangana region, Appalasuri (coastal AP) and Mahadevan (Rayalseema).

October 12:
Radical students union was formed in Andhra Pradesh. It faced brutal suppression but surged again after emergency was lifted.

1975

Following declaration of emergency on June 25 and the following repression on ultra-leftists and others, the Central Organising Committee in its September meeting decided to withdraw a “common self-critical review” and instead produce a tactical line ‘Road to Revolution’. But it did not unity among the cadres. Armed struggles were reported from Bhojpur and Naxalbari.

1976

CPI (ML) holds its second Congress on February 26-27 in the countryside of Gaya, in Bihar. It resolves to continue with armed guerilla struggles and work for an anti-Congress United Front.

1977

Amidst an upsurge of ultra-leftists’ armed actions and mass activism, CPI (ML) decides to launch a rectification campaign. The party organisation spreads to AP and Kerala.

February:
Revolutionaries organise Telangana Regional Conference in Andhra Pradesh and seeds of a peasant movement are sown in Karimnagar and Adilabad districts of the state. The conference decided to hold political classes to train new cadres and to send “squads” into forest for launching armed struggle. Eight districts of Telangana, excluding Hyderabad, were divided into two regions and two regional committees were elected.

May:
Bihar and West Bengal representatives of Central Organising Committee resign at a meeting. Andhra Pradesh representative fails to attend the meet due to the arrest of Kondapalli Seetharamaiah. The Central Organising Committee is dissolved.

1978

Rectification movements (CPI ML and fragments) limits pure military viewpoint and stresses mass peasant struggles to Indianise the Marxism-Leninism and Mao thought.
• CPI (ML) (Unity Organisation) is formed in Bihar under N Prasad’s leadership (focusing on Jehanabad-Palamu of Bihar). A peasant organisation – the Mazdoor Kisan Sangram Samiti (MKSS) is formed.

• ‘Go To Village Campaigns’ are launched by Andhra Pradesh Party of revolutionaries to propagate politics of agrarian revolution and building of Radical Youth League units in Andhra Pradesh villages. It later helped in triggering historic peasant struggles of Karimnagar and Adilabad.

Sept 7:
The famous Jagityal march is organised in Andhra Pradesh, in which thousands of people take part.

Oct 20:
Andhra Government declares Sarcilla and Jagityal ‘disturbed areas’ giving police “draconian” powers.

1979

From April to June, Village Campaign was for the first time organised jointly by RSU and RYL in Andhra Pradesh. The two organisations also expressed solidarity with National Movement of Assam.

Between 1979 to 1988, MCC focused on Bihar. A Bihar-Bengal Special Area Committee was established. The Preparatory Committee for Revolutionary Peasant Struggles was formed and soon Revolutionary Peasant Councils emerged. Two founding members of MCC passed away-Amulya Sen in March 1981 and Kanhai Chatterjee in July 1982.

1980

April 22: Kondapalli Seetharamaiah forms the Peoples War Group in Andhra Pradesh. He discards total annihilation of “class enemies” as the only form of struggle and stresses on floating mass organisations.

• Mass peasant movement spreads in Central Bihar.

• CPI (ML) puts forward the idea of broad Democratic Front as the national alternative. It was part of a process to reorganise a centre for All-India revolution after it ceased to exist in 1972.

• The central committee was formed by merging AP and Tamil Nadu State Committees and Maharashtra group of the CPI (ML). Unity Organisation did not join. The tactical adopted by the committee upheld the legacy of Naxalbari while agreeing for rectifying the “left” errors.

• CPI (ML) Red Flag is formed led by K N Ramachandran.

1981

CPI (ML) organises a unity meet of 13 Marxist-Leninist factions in a bid to form a single formation to act as the leading core of the proposed Democratic Front. However, the unity moved failed. The M-L movement begins to polarise between the Marxist-Leninist line of CPI (ML) (Liberation) and the line of CPI (ML) (People’s War).
• First state level rally is held in Patna under the banner of Bihar Pradesh Kisan Sabha beginning a new phase of mass political activism in the state.

1982
Indian People’s Front (IPF) is launched in Delhi at a national conference of CPI (ML) (Liberation). At the end of the year the third Congress of CPI (ML) is organised at Giridih (Bihar), which decides to take part in elections.

1983
Peasant movement in Assam shows signs of revival after allegedly “forced” Assembly elections. IPF plays a crucial role in this regard.
• An all-India dalit conference is held in Amravati (Maharashtra) to facilitate interaction with Ambedkarite groups.

1984
CPI (ML) and other revolutionaries try to woo Sikhs towards joining peasant movement following Operation Bluestar in June and country-wide anti-Sikh riots after Indira Gandhi’s assassination in Oct 31 the same year.

1985
People’s Democratic Front is launched in Karbi Anglong district of Assam to provide a “revolutionary democratic orientation to the tribal people’s aspirations for autonomy”.
• PDF wins a seat in Assam Assembly elections bring about the first entry of CPI (ML) cadre in the legislative arena.
• Jan Sanskriti Manch is formed at a conference of cultural activists from Hindi belt at New Delhi.

1986

• Bihar govt bans PWG and MCC
April 5-7: CPI (ML) organises a national women’s convention in Calcutta to promote cooperation and critical interaction between communist women’s organisations and upcoming feminist and autonomous women’s groups.
April 19: More than a dozen “landless labourers” are killed in police firing at Arwal in Jehanabad district of Bihar.

1987
PDF gets transformed into the Autonomous State Demand Committee.

1988
CPI (ML) holds its fourth Congress at Hazaribagh in Bihar from January 1 to 5. The Congress “rectifies” old errors of judgement in the party’s assessment of Soviet Union. It reiterates the basic principles of revolutionary communism – defence of Marxism, absolute political independence of the Communist Party and primacy of revolutionary peasant struggles in democratic revolution.
• CPI (ML) ND is formed in Bihar by Comrade Yatendra Kumar.

1989

May:
The founding conference of All India Central Council of Trade Union (AICCTU) is held in Madras. Key resolutions are passed at this meet.
November: More than a dozen “left supporters” are shot dead by landlords in Ara Lok Sabha constituency of Bhojpur district in Bihar on the eve of polls.
• CPI (ML) (Liberation) records its first electoral victory under Indian People’s Front banner. Ara sends the first “Naxalite” member to Parliament.

1990

In February Assembly election, IPF wins seven seats and finishes second in another fourteen. In Assam too, a four-member ASDC legislators’ group enters the Assembly. Special all-India Conference is held in Delhi on July 22-24 to restructure the party.
August 9-11: All India Students Association (AISA) is launched at Allahabad. It opposes VP Singh’s implementation of Mandal Commission recommendations.
Oct 8: First all-India IPF rally is held in Delhi. CPI (ML) (Liberation) claims it to be the first-ever massive mobilisation of rural poor in the capital.
• CPI (ML) S R Bhaijee group and CPI (ML) Unity Initiative are formed in Bihar. The former is still active in east and west Champaran.
• Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chenna Reddy lifts all curbs on naxal groups. Naxalites operate freely for about a year but observers say it corrupted them and adversely affected the movement.

1991
In the May Lok Sabha elections, Indian People’s Front loses Ara seat but CPI (ML) retains its presence in Parliament through ASDC MP.

1992

• Andhra Pradesh bans People’s War Group
• CPI(ML) reorganises the erstwhile Janwadi Mazdoor Kisan Samiti in South Bihar as Jharkhand Mazdoor Kisan Samiti (Jhamkis).

May 21:
Chief Minister N Janardhan Reddy bans PWG and its seven front organisations again in Andhra Pradesh.
Dec 20-26: CPI (ML) organises its fifth Congress at Calcutta from Dec 20 to 26. CPI (ML) comes out in the open and calls for a Left confederation.

1993

• AISA registers impressive victories in Allahabad, Varanasi and Nainital university elections in Uttar Pradesh besides in the prestigious Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi.
• CPI (ML) launches a new forum for Muslims called ‘Inquilabi Muslim Conference’ in Bihar.

1994

February: All India Progressive Women’s Association is launched at national women’s conference at New Delhi.
• Indian People’s Front is dissolved and fresh attempts are initiated to forge a united front of various sections of Leftists and Socialists with an anti-imperialist agenda.
• Interactions among various Communists and Left parties intensify in India and abroad to revive the movement drawing lessons from Soviet collapse.

1995

• A six-member CPI (ML) group is formed in Bihar Assembly. Two CPI (ML) nominees win from Siwan indicating the expansion of party’s influence in north Bihar.
May: N T Ramarao relaxes ban on Peoples War Group in Andhra Pradesh for three months. PWG goes in for massive recruitment drive in the state.
July: CPI (ML) organises All India Organisation Plenum at Diphu to streamline party’s organisational network.

• Revolutionary Youth Association (RYA) is launched as an all-India organisation of the radical youth.

1996

• Five members of ASDC make it to Assam assembly. An ASDC member is re-elected to Lok Sabha. Another ASDC member is elected to Rajya Sabha. ASDC retains its majority in Karbi Anglong District Council and also unseats the Congress in the neighbouring North Cachhar Hills district in Assam.
• CPI(ML) takes initiative to form a Tribal People’s Front and then Assam People’s Front
• CPI (ML) joins hands with CPI and Marxist Coordination Committee led by Comrade A Roy to strengthen Left movement.
• CPI (ML) initiates the Indian Institute of Marxist Studies. Armed clashes between ultra-leftists and upper caste private armies (like Ranvir Sena) escalate in Bihar.
• The Progressive Organisation of People, affiliated to revolutionary left movement, launches a temple entry movement for lower castes in Gudipadu near Kurnool in Andhra Pradesh. It emerges successful.

1997

CPI (ML) organises a massive ‘Halla Bol’ rally in Patna. A left supported Bihar bandh is organised as part of “Oust Laloo Campaign” in view of the Rs 950-crore fodder scam.

1999

• CPI (ML) Party Unity merges with Peoples War.
• Naxalites launch major strikes. CPI (ML) PW kills six in Jehanabad on February 14. MCC kills 34 upper caste in Senai village of Jehanabad.
Dec 2: Three top PWG leaders killed in Andhra Pradesh leading to a large scale brutal naxalite attacks on state forces.
Dec 16: PWG hacks to death Madhya Pradesh Transport Minister Likhiram Kavre in his village in Blalaghat district to avenge the killing of three top PWG leaders in police encounter on Dec 2.

2000

• PWG continues with its revenge attacks. Blasts house of ruling Telugu Desam Party MP G Sukhender Reddy in Nalgonda district in Andhra Pradesh in January. In February it blows up a Madhya Pradesh police vehicle killing 23 cops, including an ASP. It destroys property worth Rs 5 crore besides killing 10 persons in AP in the same month.

Dec 2: PWG launches People’s Guerrilla Army (PGA) to counter security forces offensive.

2001

April: CPI (ML) celebrates 32nd anniversary of its foundation in Patna on April 22 and gives a call to rekindle ‘revolutionary spirit of naxalism’.

July: Naxalite groups all over South Asia form a Coordination Committee of Maoist Parties and Organisations of South Asia (CCOMPOSA) which is said to be first such an international coalition. PWG and MCC are part of it.
• As per the Intelligence reports, MCC and PWG establish links with LTTE, Nepali Maoists and Pakistan’s Inter-Service Intelligence to receive arms and training. Naxalites bid to carve out a corridor through some areas of Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, and Uttar Pradesh up to Nepal.

Nov: MCC organises a violent Jharkhand Bandh on Nov 26.

Dec: Naxalites, mainly in AP, Orissa and Bihar celebrate People’s Guerilla Week hailing the formation of PGA on Dec 2. The week unfolds major violence in the three states during which a plant of Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu and the house of an Orissa minister is blown up.